The Power of A Garden that’s Open to the Public

August 29th, 2015

I’ve spent a very enjoyable portion of my life visiting gardens – small and large – rustic and elegant – casual and formal – public and private. I’ve visited as a girl, as a daughter, as a student, as a writer, and as a mother watching my own kids roll around and revel and learn in all these same kinds of gardens. PHOTO: A broad late summer sweep of the Mary Wattis Brown Native Plant Garden at UC Davis Arboretum.

When I was younger, I actually had a list of goals for my own home garden in construction. These goals ranged from the superficial to the philosophic and included having a hand built dry stack stone wall, having a small fruit tree orchard, having the willingness to open my garden to the public one day, and to be able and willing to host events in my garden for the benefit of charitable endeavors my family and I supported.

I can happily report that over the last 20 years with the help of family and friends these goals have all been met at least once – the emphasis in that information being placed firmly on: WITH THE HELP OF FAMILY AND FRIENDS OVER TIME. Each goal met taught me something about the way things work, about my own limitations and strengths, and about the power of community. PHOTO: A view down the main pathway at the McConnell Arboretum and Gardens at Turtle Bay Exploration Park in Redding..

All of these goals and the ways in which they were ultimately met in way or another supported my belief in the benefits of sharing a garden, and reminded me of the importance of opening private gardens and public gardens. When I recently visited a small public historical society interested in developing a native plant pollinator and ethnobotanical garden as an ecological and educational addition to their public facility – my first reaction was: “Wow - in this drought, in the economy of this particular small town - to establish a new public garden is an act of supreme optimism.”

Which on that day, in that week, was a needed reminder for ME!! Right! The ecological, educational, cultural and social goals of all gardens and gardeners are supreme acts of optimism in a world that can use them. Gardening and its “goals” are never a one-stop destination or possession but a storied journey of process – and hope. PHOTO: The Native Plant Pollinator Garden at Gateway Science Museum in Chico.

While it may not seem like the best time to visit gardens, there is in fact never a bad time to visit them and you can always learn something. In this dry late summer and early fall, we can certainly all use lessons on good plants, good techniques, good looks for our place at this time. Consider a visit to a local garden near you soon.

If you live in or plan to be visiting the Chico area in late September - on September 27th Altacal Audubon, the Mt. Lassen Chapter of the CNPS and the Butte Environmental Council will co-host a native plant garden tour of public and private gardens in and around Chico from 10 – 2 pm. For more information or to register for the tour, go to the Butte Environmental Council Tour Registration Page. PHOTO: A researcher, Jaime, from UC Berkeley’s Urban Bee Garden program collects data on how and to what extent urban gardens work to support native bee populations. Public gardens are excellent resources for such on going research and learning opportunities.

For a listing of many public gardens in the North State, visit the Links and Resources Page at Jewellgarden.com.

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PHOTO: A hand woven willow house that was built in place at the McConnell Arboretum and Gardens at Turtle Bay several years ago.

In a North State Garden is a North State Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California and made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday morning at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time, every three weeks.

Late Summer Beauty of Buckwheats

August 15th, 2015

It’s August. Drought or no drought, August is hot and dry in interior northern California and in most cases, our gardens are looking a little…worn, a little worse for the wear of our long, hot, dry summers. Every gardener I know, prefaces a high or late summer visit to their garden with the warning: “You can come, but you won’t be seeing the garden at its best, you know.” PHOTO: Native buckwheat(s) on the slopes of Mt. Eddy, 2015. Read the rest of this entry »

Fortunately: A Rich Resource for Gardeners in Times of Drought

July 25th, 2015

When my children were little among the books they loved to have read to them was one entitled Fortunately, first published in 1964 and written by Remy Charlip. The story goes something like this -

“Fortunately, Ned was invited to a surprise party.
Unfortunately, the party was a thousand miles away.
Fortunately, a friend loaned Ned an airplane.
Unfortunately, the motor exploded.
Fortunately, there was a parachute in the airplane.”

And it continues like this in a memorable do si do of good fortune being followed by less good fortune being followed by good fortune in the journey of this young man trying to make it to a birthday party – which turns out to be his own. PHOTO: California is home to a remarkable number of climate adapted plants. Unfortunately, this can be daunting and confusing when considering which ones to try in your home garden. Fortunately, California has plants native to almost every style, exposure and soil type. Read the rest of this entry »

Getting to Know a Familiar Face: Manzanitas of North America

June 20th, 2015

Today I am joined by Michael Kauffmann co-author of the new Field Guide to the Manzanitas of California, North America and Mexico, published this year by Backcountry Press. Michael last joined me in 2012 after the publication of his first book, Conifer Country. PHOTO: A Butte County manzanita in early spring bloom.

Studying conifers - their diversity in Northern California and the “compelling story” they tell about the world around us, past and present, was in fact part of what brought manzanitas to Michael’s attention. “When I first moved to California in the late 1990s, I knew we had manzanitas, but they were all just generic manzanita. As I studied and got to know the conifers, I began to realize that there were often manzanitas associated with them, and they were often very different.” PHOTO: A. canescens. Photo courtesy of Jeff Bisbee. © 2015

So 3 years later comes the publication of “Field Guide to Manzanitas - California, North American, and Mexico”. His co-authors on the book (and the adventure of finding, studying, and photographing) are Tom Parker and Michael Vasey, the book is beautifully illustrated with photographs by Jeff Bisbee. As Dan Gluesenkamp, Executive Director of the California Native Plant Society notes in his testimonial on the back cover: “This book is more than just a field guide to manzanitas, it is a tour of California and an exploration of the diversity that makes this land wondrous and special.”PHOTO: Cover of Field Guide to Manzanitas. Photo courtesy of Backcountry Press. © 2015 Read the rest of this entry »

North American Butterfly Association Annual Butterfly Count, June 5 for Big Chico Creek Region, led by Dr. Don Miller

May 30th, 2015

On Friday June 5, nature enthusiasts will gather at 8:30 am at the Big Chico Creek Ecological Reserve just outside of Forest Ranch to conduct the 9th Annual Butterfly Count for the Big Chico Creek Region, Dr. Don Miller tells us in an interview about the upcoming event. Dr. Miller is a Professor of Entomology in the Department of Biological Sciences at CSU, Chico, as well as being a butterfly expert and enthusiast.

For the past 40 years, the North American Butterfly Association (NABA) has hosted the annual “4th of July Butterfly Counts” across the country. While many areas reach their peak butterfly populations around July 4, in our area the peak is a little earlier before extended extreme heat, so our region’s count is always the first Friday in June, explained Don. And EVERYONE IS INVITED TO JOIN IN AND HELP. Read the rest of this entry »

Giving Back: The 4th Annual Veterans’ Garden Project Memorial Day Platn Giveaway

May 2nd, 2015

This weekend, May 2nd and 3rd, 2015, Michelle Angela, Director and Rosemary Febbo, Project Manager, of the Veterans’ Garden Project of Butte, Glen and Tehama Counties, talked to us about the project and its 4th Annual Memorial Day Plant Give-away coming up on Monday May 25th, 2015.

U.S. VETERANS RECEIVE FREE GARDEN PLANTS Memorial Day - May 25, 2015

The diverse skills and abilities, plus impressive work ethics that veterans gain from their military experience can be game-changers for our communities. Veterans face obstacles in returning to civilian life and will need our help before they can help all of us yet again. The VETERANS’ GARDEN PROJECT’s mission is to enable and encourage the act of gardening for healing of mind, soul and body to all U.S. Veterans in Butte, Tehama and Glenn counties. Read the rest of this entry »

Expanding your Gardening Awareness: Poison Oak & the North State Garden

April 18th, 2015

PHOTO: An expansive native oak in a natural oak woodland setting, just up from the banks of Chico Creek. Look closely, its trunk is encircled with a stand of poison oak, just leafing out. Some of the poison oak twines its way up the trunk of the tree. Both plants provide a lot of food and shelter for woodland creatures.

Sometimes it’s the difficult things, the things that challenge us, that help us to stretch and grow the most.

This axiom – or cliché - is as true in the garden as it is in any other area of our lives. The aspects of the garden and gardening we find challenging are what require us to really look at what we’re made of – at what intentions and hopes drive us. It is the spiders, snakes and gophers, the disease, drought and death that pose such questions for us.

PHOTO: Poison oak in flower. Some people say the flowers are magnets for pollinators and smell lightly of clove.

I am currently reading Secrets of the Oak Woodlands by California naturalist Kate Marianchild. The book’s section on poison oak as a keystone plant of our oak woodlands reminds me that at this time of year in particular, it’s poison oak - finishing up its flowering, setting seed, leafing out in all of its glossy green summer glory, and sending up tiny seedlings in my garden, that asks me directly and personally WHO AM I AS A GARDENER?


PHOTO: Poison oak’s immature fleshy seeds.

Poison oak’s botanical name is Toxicodendrun diversilobum. Although it used to be considered a member of the Rhus genus, Toxicodendron is now its own genus and consists of woody trees, shrubs and vines in the Anacardiaceae or Sumac Family, all members of the genus produce the skin-irritating oil urushiol. While some people are less susceptible, most people will develop the rash if they come in direct contact with the oil. Some say that you can develop immunity, others say that you can lose resistance or immunity with repeated exposure. The native people of the North State are thought to have eaten the berries of the plant in order to build immunity. I am highly prone to this skin irritation (as are up to 90% of people, but very few other animals) and in my first three springs gardening in the North State, I contracted poison oak so badly on my face and arms I was forced to go to the emergency room for a steroid shot in order to open my left eye.

Three springs in a row.

PHOTO: Poison oak’s immature fleshy seeds.

Take away its rash inducing nature and poison oak is in fact everything a gardener wants in a good shrub – it’s adapted to our climate, thrives in most soils, its flowers are lightly scented - some say like cloves. Its foliage is attractive in its burnt-red spring growth, in its deep summer greenery and in its fabulous range of fall color. It bears eye catching fruit which persists through winter, and is attractive in all seasons to birds and pollinators.

But IT DOES have this rash inducing nature.

PHOTO: Poison oak’s seeds as they mature and the fleshy out layer dries and becomes papery.

So while we may not want to encourage it IN our gardens, poison oak IS integral to the foothill and valley woodland and riparian ecosystems of the North State. According to research presented by Marianchild, more than 50 of our most enjoyed resident and migratory song birds, as well as pollinators, beetles and lizards depend on the poison oak – its leaves and seeds – for both food and shelter. Further, other plants of these ecosystems rely on poison oak’s ability to re-sprout after fire or clearing in order to protect (nurse plant) them as they regrow more slowly.

Once upon a time I thought seriously about attempting to eradicate a large swath of poison growing on a bank on the other side of my own garden fence where my garden interfaced with a wildland corridor.

PHOTO: Poison oak’s dried and persistent seeds.The dark red veining of the very hard seed coat is the oily resin.

“It’s a hazard to me and my family and walkers on the trail,” I thought. “I could hire a crew to remove it and then spray the young shoots with Round-Up.” (Right now you should hear emphatic BOO-ing from the listening audience). Ultimately, and thankfully, I did neither of these things. Read the rest of this entry »

April in the North State Garden & Monthly Calendar of Gardening Events

March 28th, 2015

Our very mild winter and early warm temperatures, with little precipitation, have brought us to what feels like an early burst of life and color in the garden this year some of my garden plants - roses and salvias for example seem close to a full month early. With the urban world in bloom and the wildlands already beginning to dry for summer – there is much related motion. Grasshoppers, birds and butterflies are on the move to cooler temperatures and more food in their summer territories.

PHOTO: A tiny egg casing after the new caterpillar has hatched. According to Monarchwatch.org “Monarch butterfly eggs are somewhat difficult to find in the wild. Since it only takes 3-5 days for eggs to hatch, timing is crucial. The best sign is to watch for adult Monarchs stopping at milkweed plants. A female will usually lay only one egg per milkweed plant to ensure enough food for each larva.” Read the rest of this entry »

Happy (and Hungry) are the Hummingbirds

March 14th, 2015

PHOTO: A hummingbird sitting on her tiny nest. Her body literally fills the lichen, spider web, twig and fluff-constructed nest to the edges, sealing in the eggs from weather and temperature fluctuations.

Spring is here and more than a few creatures have spring fever. Daily I strip long lines of pale green aphids from the tender shoots of my young roses.

PHOTO: An Anna’s hummingbird nectaring at spring-blooming, California native Salvia spathacea - commonly known as Hummingbird Sage. Photo by J. Jewell.

While the rapid reproduction of the aphids might be less than appealing, other sights of spring are amazing and endearing to even the most non-gardening among us. Read the rest of this entry »

March in the Garden & North State Calendar of Gardening Events

February 28th, 2015

As spring rises, so do my gardening urges – dreams and plans. Thankfully, the older I get – and it’s a nice round number for me this year – the more deeply I care about some things, and the far less I care about others. This is true in all facets of my life. I care far less about how much of a given thing and far more about the quality of that thing. I care far less about who else said what or thinks what about any given thing, and far more about what I believe that given thing adds to the world as whole.

As a much younger gardener I will admit to having been downright greedy and acquisitive – I wanted this exotic flower grown there by this famous gardener and photographed so beautifully in that glossy magazine and I wanted that selection of pots handmade over there and shipped all the way here to add a sense of (admittedly someone else’s) “style” to my garden.

The constraints of age and money and time itself have all brought a little more understanding, a little more appreciation for what is right here and right now each year. My dreams and plans are more mindfully crafted.

As with my children and my food, I WANT to know where the plants and other items in my garden have been and how they got here - home to me. I want my garden to be far greater than the sum of its part and its looks – I want it to play well with the world around it and even more importantly I want it to bring real value to the world around it. I want to enjoy my flowers and my food and pots knowing that how they were grown or made, how they were transported to me and how they were treated until they got to me did as little harm to other people and other places as possible. I approach my garden more and more as I approach my children, believing that it needs less stuff and more time and presence.

The older I get the more clear I am that each choice I make, each dollar and hour I spend is a value I place that affects myriad others, and the more I feel a deep and abiding sense of responsibility to those others. It’s both a sobering and joyous sense of life’s interconnectedness – starting right here, in my home garden.

THINGS TO DO IN THE GARDEN THIS MONTH:

The “luminous insistence of growing things” – as described by Ansel Adams - navigates and is oriented by the particular quality of light at any one moment in a day, in a season, in a life. You, me, our gardens, photographers, poets, plants people and pansies - are calibrated to a certain amount of light - and of dark - in order to thrive. We need sufficient amounts of both. We rise and rest with the shifting of the light as with any other essential nutrient. By the moment of the Vernal Equinox, we will be receiving close to 2 hours and 40 minutes more daylight than we received on the Winter Solstice in December – and the whole world will energetically reflect this added luminosity and the benefits gained from the healing of winter’s rest.

Although the first official day of Spring is March 20th - average last frost dates are still a ways away for most of us – mid-April for the earliest of us - so don’t get too excited too quickly. In the North State Garden, March is a great time for continuing to sow cold hardy vegetable seeds or planting out cold hardy perennials and shrubs to begin establishing before true spring. It’s also time for a balanced fertilizer for your trees, shrubs and lawns that are starting to show signs of growth. March 1st is a traditional date on which to feed citrus trees. And just to mess with light and time even more - don’t forget that March 8th, our clocks will spring forward.

Good vegetables to direct seed outside this month include beets, carrots, chard, corn, leeks, lettuce, potatoes, radishes and turnips. Summer blooming bulbs and seed potatoes are also ready put in. When preparing my beds for planting, I dig in well-aged compost that includes the composted manure from my chickens. When preparing to plant, make sure that your soil is neither too wet nor too dry – people often describe the perfect soil texture for seeding as being that of moist chocolate cake. Once seeds are sown, they must be kept consistently damp until they germinate.

March in the North State calendar of gardening events is bookended by some powerful gardening events that speak to both joy and interconnectedness - and the optimistic act gardening can and should be. The On-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events at jewellgarden.com adds events throughout the month. I do my very best to keep the calendar up to date and accurate, please confirm all events with the event host. If you have an event you would like listed or if you are aware of a mistake on the calendar, please send all pertinent information to: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com! Thanks!

Feb 28 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS FIELD TRIP: Mule Ridge Trail. This will be a five-mile, out-and-back hike with a very gradual climb of about 1000 ft in the BLM Mule Ridge Trails area. This winding trail starts at the Oak Knoll Trailhead on Muletown Road and winds its way up to the top of a ridge. With the ample rains, we should see a number of early blooming wildflowers and shrubs along the way. There is a considerable amount of open grasslands and switchbacks into canyons along the trail. Meet at the Mt. Shasta Mall near Chase Bank at 9 AM to carpool to the trailhead. Well-behaved dogs on leashes okay on this fieldtrip. For more information, call David Ledger at 355-8542. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

Feb 28 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Walk with Horticultural Manager Lisa Endicott 10:30 am. Bring your notebooks and camera! We’ll make our way through the Gardens with frequent stops for discussions about (what else?) plants! Free with Park or Garden admission. Meet at West Garden Entrance. Take N. Market Street, turn on Arboretum Drive. Take the right fork. Parking lot and entrance are on the left.

Feb 28 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum All thing Acacia 2 p.m., Putah Creek Lodge. The late winter display of yellow blossoms in the Eric E. Conn Acacia Grove is spectacular! It’s a must-see event featuring over 50 different acacias from around the world. The event is free; parking is free on weekends in Putah Creek Lodge Visitor Parking Lot off Garrod Drive. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Feb 27 & 28 – Chico: 2nd ANNUAL LOCAL NURSERY CRAWL: February 27 and 28, Friday and Saturday. Time 9am to 4pm (both days) What’s the Local Nursery Crawl all about: The purpose of this event is to get the public to visit and familiarize themselves with the many independent nurseries in the area and inspire loyalty and community support for local business. How the event works: Community crawlers will have a map that includes all the participating local nurseries. To encourage crawlers to visit multiple nurseries, each location will be able to place a sticker on a designated spot of the map and crawlers who visit 6 nurseries will receive a free Chico Bag with the Local Nursery Crawl logo on it. (while supplies last) Most nurseries will be holding raffles, special deals and offering refreshments. Also, some will be offering Classes or workshops during the Local Nursery Crawl event hours. For more info: http://www.localnurserycrawl.com/about/

MARCH 2015

March 1 – Chico: Sixth Annual Spring Seed Swap 2 pm - 6 pm, THE 6TH ANNUAL SPRING SEED SWAP ~ carpooling or riding bikes is encouraged~ WHAT IS PROVIDED >Seed Swap ‘Potluck’ Style >Speaker Presentations >Educational Displays >Seeds & Plants for Sale >Community Non-Profits >Food & Drinks for sale by Chico Natural Foods Cooperative >Lots of activities for all ages WHAT TO BRING >Seeds, bulbs, plants, cuttings or more to exchange >Used envelopes/containers and pens/pencils >Please label your items ~ you do not need seeds to attend ~ PRESENTATION SCHEDULE TBA TO VOLUNTEER Sign up online: http://volunteercpg.ivolunteer.com/6thspringseedswap FOR MORE INFORMATION >Sherri Scott (GRUB Education Program) 342-3376 sherri@grubchico.org >Stephanie Ladwig-Cooper (Chico Permaculture Guild) 828-6390 modcpg@gmail.com. HOSTED BY GRUB Education Program Chico Permaculture Guild SPONSORED BY Chico Grange Hall Chico Seed Lending Library (CSLL) Chico Natural Foods Cooperative ALWAYS A FREE COMMUNITY EVENT!

March 4 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Monthly meeting Ellen Dean, Curator of the UC Davis Center for Plant Diversity Herbarium. Natural Attributes of Proposed Berryessa Snow Mountain National Monument. At: Chico Branch County Library, 1st & Sherman Ave. Chico. For more info:http://mountlassen.cnps.org

March 5 - FULL MOON

March 7 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Charlie Rabbit and His Friends 10:30 am. Join us the first Saturday of every month for an interactive program in the Gardens (or Greenhouse when it rains) for children, their siblings, parents and Grandparents. Join Charlie, our adorable jack rabbit puppet, in various gardening activities. Wear your favorite gardening clothes! Presented by Dennis and Sherrill Bambauer. Free with park admission! Meet at the Arboretum & Botanical Gardens Office (1135 Arboretum Drive next to Nursery Greenhouse)

March 7 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: Victory Gardening 101: THE BASICS (1st class in a 3 class series) 10 am and 1 pm. Learn the basics for a productive and healthy garden. Climate zone, location set-up, Soil prep and seed starting. Classes fill up fast, so please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

March 7 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum MEMBER APPRECIATON PLANT SALE to Support the Friends of the UC Davis Arboretum and Public Garden 9 a.m. - 1 p.m., UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery (Garrod Drive near La Rue Road, across from Vet Med), UC Davis campus We know that many homeowners out there are in the process of developing their “New Front Yard” by replacing high-water use plants with low-water alternatives. That’s why you are going to find just what you need and get the best selection at our first plant sale of the spring season. We are going to have thearea’s largest selection of attractive, drought-tolerant, easy-care, region-appropriate plantsincluding loads of grasses, California natives and Arboretum All-Stars. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

March 8 - Daylight Savings - Clocks Spring Forward 1 hour

March 8 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Field Trip: Maidu Plants Walk Upper Park 9:00 AM. Maidu Plants Walk in Upper Bidwell Park - Chico. Meet at the Horseshoe Lake parking lot “E” in Upper Bidwell Park. Leader: Wes Dempsey, phone: 530-342-2293 For more info:http://mountlassen.cnps.org

March 11 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Walk With Warren Noon, Arboretum Gazebo Join our Superintendent Emeritus Warren Roberts–famous storyteller and punster–for an always engaging noontime exploration of the UC Davis Arboretum’s West-end gardens. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

March 14 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: Victory Gardening 101: PLANTING (2nd class in a 3 class series) 10 am and 1 pm. Layout of plants, choosing vegetables, planting dates, techniques, transplanting starts, pollination spacing and crop rotation. Classes fill up fast, so please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

March 14 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Delights Down Under 11 a.m., Arboretum GATEway Garden behind Davis Commons Shopping Center (meet at the Shovel Gateway Sculpture) Plants from “down under” show off their flowers during the rainy season. Tour the Australian and New Zealand collections and have a blooming good time learning about plants from far-away lands. The event is free;free parking is available in the Davis Commons Shopping Center. The event is free;free parking is available in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 5. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

March 14 - Fair Oaks: Fair Oaks Horticultural Center OPEN HOUSE 9 - 12 noon, Open Garden - Ask us questions and watch what we are doing at this time of year. Master Gardeners will provide tips on how to select water efficient plants and grow warm-season vegetables. Learn how to manage pests in the orchard and vineyard. http://ucanr.edu/sites/sacmg/Fair_Oaks_Horticulture_Center/Workshop_Schedule/

March 15 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Field Trip: Yahi Trail Upper Park 9:00 AM. Yahi Trail in Upper Bidwell Park - Chico. Meet at the Diversion Dam Parking Lot “L” in Upper Bidwell Park. Leaders: Wes Dempsey, 530-342-2293: Gerry Ingco, 530-893-5123. For more info:http://mountlassen.cnps.org

March 16 - Chico: Chico Horticultural Society Regular Monthly Meeting 9:30 am meet/coffee, 10 am program. Butte County Library - 1st Avenue, Chico. For more info: President, Susi G. at gillums@yahoo.com

March 19 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Chapter Meeting. Meet at 7 PM at the Shasta College Health Science & University Programs building in downtown Redding, 1400 Market Street, Community Room 8220 (clock tower building at the north end of the Market Street Promenade; enter on south side of building). A Board meeting will be held before the regular meeting, at 5:30 PM at Angelo’s Pizza Parlour in the Foundry Square, 1774 California Street, Redding. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

March 20 - Vernal Equinox - first day of Spring!

March 21 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: Victory Gardening 101: FERTILIZING, COMPOST & PESTS (3rd class in a 3 class series) 10 am and 1 pm. Basic watering set ups for home gardens, fertilizing options, compost techniques and insects (good and bad). Classes fill up fast, so please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

March 21 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Botanical Gardens Drought and Heat-Adapted Plants Mediterranean Basin Garden Plants 9 - 11 am. If you have wanted to know specific, local information about tough, beautiful plants that are happy to grow in our own Mediterranean climate zone, join Turtle Bay’s Horticulture staff for this botanical gardens plant class focusing on plants in the Mediterranean Basin Garden. These plants have not only a large variety of ornamental textures and colors, they are also easy to cultivate and maintain!

March 22 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Field Trip: Spotted Fawn Lily and McNab Cypress 9:00 AM. Spotted Fawn Lilies & McNab Cypress - Lassen National Forest. Meet at Chico Park & Ride west lot (Hwys 32/99). Call leaders for a secondary meeting place: Gerry Ingco 530-893-5123 and Wes Dempsey 530-342-2293. For more info:http://mountlassen.cnps.org

March 28 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Spring Surprises in the Storer Garden 11 a.m.,UC Davis Arboretum Gazebo, UC Davis Campus Our valley-wise demonstration garden, the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden, is beautiful year round, but especially in spring. Just in time for our first public plant sale of the spring season on April 11, you can come get great ideas for your own water-thrifty garden. The event is free;free parking is available in the Davis Commons Shopping Center. The event is free;free parking is available in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 5. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

March 28 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Walk with Horticultural Manager Lisa Endicott 10:30 am. Bring your notebooks and camera! We’ll make our way through the Gardens with frequent stops for discussions about (what else?) plants! Free with Park or Garden admission. Meet at West Garden Entrance. Take N. Market Street, turn on Arboretum Drive. Take the right fork. Parking lot and entrance are on the left.

March 28 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Field Trip: Divide Ranch Walk and Bear Valley 9:00 AM. Divide Ranch Walk, Glen Co. & Bear Valley Drive, Colusa Co. Meet at Chico Park & Ride west lot (Hwys 32/99). Leader: Woody Elliott, 530-588-2555, email: woodyelliott@gmail.com. For more info:http://mountlassen.cnps.org

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To submit plant/gardening related events/classes to the Jewellgarden.com on-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events, send the pertinent information to me at: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com

In a North State Garden is a bi-weekly North State Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California and made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday morning at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time, two times a month.