In a North State Garden and Two New Friends

April 12th, 2014

On Tuesday April 8th, I hosted a special edition of In a North State Garden during Northstate Public Radio’s Spring Membership drive the theme for which has been “A Steady Stream.” With this in mind, my special was a celebration of the steady stream of garden, nature, ecology and local food programming that North State Public Radio provides now and was also an introduction to some new tributaries to this healthy stream of information and community.

My guests on the program were Pam Geisel – former statewide coordinator of the University of California Master Gardener program, and a previous guest on In a North State Garden many times, as well as Matt Shilts, my producer and engineer for In a North State Garden. Joining us in spirit was Earl Bloor, food writer and photographer and co-publisher for the past 8 years with his wide Candace of the local food magazine, Edible Shasta Butte.

For the past 6.5 years, since I first approached Northstate Public Radio’s famed “Joe O” in November 2007 about Northstate Public Radio once again developing a garden program, the station has supported the weekly program In a North State Garden. We have produced more than 300 plant people and place profiles of interesting things going on and being done in relation to plants and the natural environment in our 10 county region. The entire journey has been expanding and illuminating for me personally.

This week, Northstate Public Radio and I would like to announce some increased diversity to our crop of garden and local food programming with the introduction of two new field-fork, from-the-ground-up programs that will be joining In a North State Garden as weekend plant-related programs.

Beginning with programming the week of April 19th, In a North State Garden will be joined in a weekly rotation with two additional plant programs – one conceived and hosted by Pam Geisel entitled “The Practical Gardener” the mission of which is to provide practical, research based solutions to garden problems and the other program entitled “Edible Northstate”, hosted by Earl Bloor, and the mission of this program being to raise awareness and educate our radio audience to the importance of improving our local food system for food availability, health and sustainable economic growth of our communities.

Our producer and engineer will be the unflappable Matt Shilts.

If you are a lover of the gardening/plant/environmental programming on Northstate Public Radio – you’re listening to In a North State Garden’s spring 2014 membership drive special “A Steady Stream of Plant Programming” from North State Public Radio. If environmental issues, community issues and local programming are important to you - I urge you to make a pledge to the station today: www.kcho.org.

“The Practical Gardener”, hosted by Pam Geisel.

Program Mission: to provide practical, research based solutions to garden problems.

Program Description: “THE PRACTICAL GARDENER is a show about helping to bring the science of gardening to home gardener in a way that is understandable. I want people understand the science but in ways that are applied, researched based and implementable in the home garden. I want to give people ideas about how they can have beautiful but sustainable gardens using practical methods. It’s always great fun to look at really complicated strategies for managing certain pests. However, the reality of what you might be able to actually implement at home is often limited. One great example is managing peach leaf curl on peaches and nectarines. I have heard one strategy to control this disease is to manually pick off infected individual leaves. The science and research doesn’t support this this practice in that it doesn’t do anything to reduce future infections or the spread of the disease. The practical and science based solution is to invest in resistant varieties if you are planting new trees and to spray the trees at bud swell in the spring before the buds show any color with copper.”

Pam’s Personal Story: “I have a Masters Degree in Plant Science with an emphasis in Pest Management with Post graduate work in Agronomy/turfgrass management. I have worked for the university of California in the Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources as a Horticulture Advisor; first I Fresno County for 25 years and then was the Director for the UC Master Gardener program for 8 years at UC Davis. I moved to the North state about 7 years ago from Davis after meeting the love of my life. I recently retired from the University and now am a horticulture consultant and teacher for Master Gardener Training sessions throughout California.”

To reach Pam with questions or topics you’d like to hear covered, contact her by email: Pamela Geisel - pgeisel@ucanr.edu.

“Edible Northstate”, hosted by Earl Bloor

Purpose: To raise awareness and educate our radio audience to the importance of improving our local food system for food availability, health and sustainable economic growth of our communities.

Program Description: There is a wealth of people in north central California to tap for interesting programming and we also plan on interviewing experts and authors outside our region. Some interviews will be by phone, some in studio and some onsite in the fields, markets or restaurants. Edible Northstate will feature interviews with growers, chefs, food craft producers, consumers, policy makers and educators. We will highlight local issues and personalities who also represent national issues, problems and solutions

Topics for Discussion might include: -GMO -Differences in Round-Up Ready insertion compared with drought tolerant enhancement. Adding/removing genes -Climate Change -How is agriculture planning to adapt -How can home gardeners adapt - Aging Farmers and Barriers to farm/ranch ownership/operation - Pollination -Honeybee Colony Collapse -Post harvest produce from Financing to Co-Packer to Store Shelf -What’s involved, how to do it and who’s done it successfully - Positive Indicators and trends in small-scale agriculture -The future of urban agriculture - Water and urban ag policies that will improve local food production.

Earl’s Personal Story: For eight years my wife Candace Byrne and I have been
chronicling the local abundance of the Northstate in a magazine we publish, Edible Shasta-Butte .

I continue to be impressed with the growth in opportunities to purchase fresh, healthy, locally-grown food in our community and in communities throughout this country. Farmers’ Markets are growing and bursting at the seams with shoppers eager to purchase healthy food. More farmers’ markets are opening to meet this demand. And recipients of the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), or CalFresh, are no longer issued paper Food Stamps. Instead, they are issued an Electronic Benefit Transfer (or EBT) card which can be used at farmers’ markets to pay for fresh, local food. And Farmers’ Markets are being supplemented with a growing number of CSAs ― Community Supported Agriculture programs ― in which individuals contract with farmers for regular (usually weekly) boxes of fresh produce.

And there are other innovative ways that food is being distributed. Such as the 15 different farms in Siskiyou County, Full Circle Farms, that pool their produce to offer weekly bags of fruit, vegetables, herb, artisan bread, mushrooms, flowers and more! And there are Craig and Jen Thompson in Scott Valley who operate Rockside Ranch Farmstand near Etna where all sorts of food ­ and even firewood ­ can be purchased or ordered for delivery.

To reach Earl with questions or topics you’d like to hear covered, contact him by email: Earl Bloor - earl.bloor@comcast.net.

The “From-the-Ground-Up” Suite of Garden Programs are co-productions of Northstate Public Radio.

Follow Jewellgarden.com/In a North State Garden on Facebook - become a fan today!

To submit plant/gardening related events/classes to the Jewellgarden.com on-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events, send the pertinent information to me at: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com

Did you know I send out a weekly email with information about upcoming topics and gardening related events in the North State region? If you would like to be added to the mailing list, send an email to Jennifer@jewellgarden.com.

In a North State Garden is a weekly Northstate Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California. It is made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday mornings at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time.

Shasta Chapter CNPS Spring Native Plant Sale - April 10 - 12

March 29th, 2014

PHOTO: Members of the Shasta Chapter CNPS Plant Propagation team - Back row, standing, left to right: Jay Thesken, Kathryn McKnight, Wayne Steffes, Nikki Gallaugher, Susan Gallaugher, Chris Gray. Front row, left to right: Paula Crumpton, Margaret Widdowson, Terri Thesken, Ken Kilborn, Karen Little.

On Thursday, Friday and Saturday April 10th, 11th and 12th - the Redding-based Shasta Chapter of the California Native Society will hold their annual spring plant sale open to the public. One of two plant sales a year, the spring sale is the culminating event of a long (sometimes 18 - 24 months long) endeavor to propagate a wide variety of native plants for sale to home gardeners as well as larger landholders, including county, state and federal restoration sites. Read the rest of this entry »

Penstemons: Colorful Western Perennials for the North State Garden

March 22nd, 2014

PHOTO: Foothills penstemon (Penstemon heterophyllus) in vigorous summer bloom in a low-water Chico home garden.

Some people call them beardtongue – the visual image of which always made me laugh as a girl. Now – as an adult gardener whose criteria for garden plants include: provide color, provide food for me or attract insects and birds, require low maintenance, low water and not be too fussy, the various Penstemon that make a home in my garden make me happy for a whole handful of reasons.

PHOTO: Foothills penstemon ‘Margarita BOP’(P. h. ‘Margarita BOP’ a cultivar developed by Bert Wilson of Las Pilitas nursery) forms a strong cohesive and colorful edging in a very dry, exposed garden in Stonyford, CA.

It is officially spring and I spent a good part of the first day of spring cutting the dead and spent seed heads back on herbaceous perennials. This cutting back is rejuvenating for the plants, stimulating lush new growth from the base, now that the chance of frost is unlikely, most of the seeds are distributed and most potential nesting materials gathered by the birds that might want them.

PHOTO: Native Colorado penstemon (Penstemon sp.) in spring bloom on a rocky foothills outcropping.

Among the plants getting their spring haircut were penstemons, the colors and tubular flower forms of which I look forward to expectantly each spring – as do my garden’s many hummingbirds. I remember the purple penstemons of the high meadows around my childhood home situated at 8,000 feet in Colorado’s Rocky Mountains, and how my mother would use the almost iridescent stems in her floral designs for early summer brides.

PHOTO: The dramatic and elegant almost 6 foot high wands of Palmer’s penstemon (Penstemon palmeri) in bloom in a low-water Chico home garden. These tall graceful plants with their glaucus blue-green leaves can be found on roadside verges in the high valleys between Mt. Shasta and Klamath Falls as well as in the Mojave desert.

Penstemons are prized by Western gardeners for good reason – they comprise the largest genus of flowering plants endemic to North America with more than 250 species – most of which are western natives and most of which bloom in vibrant colors, thriving in conditions we know well: hot, dry and lean.

PHOTO: A close up of Palmer’s penstemon (Penstemon palmeri) illustrating the so-called bearded tongue.

Penstemons were reclassified in the last 10 years from the figwort family of plants to the plantain family of plants. Their common name of beardtongue is due to a sterile stamen having a tuft of hairs forming a fuzzy beard on the prominent lower petal.

PHOTO: The bright red scarlet bugler Penstemon (Penstemon centranthifolius) in the wilds of Colusa County.

Penstemons offer an amazing range of color in the wild and in the garden – cream, white, pink, purple, blue, and red among them. Besides this and their willingness to survive hot, dry conditions and look lovely, another reason to add penstemons to your life is their usefulness in almost any part of the garden. Penstemons come as low ground hugging mats, as bushy mid-sized pools of color, or as elegant wands suited to be stars at the back of a planting.

PHOTO: A deep purple blue patch of native penstemon (Penstemon sp.) in attractive bloom in the Trinity Alps in July.

Some penstemons will bloom better with regular water, but not all, and under most garden conditions they are what we think of as short-lived perennials, lasting 2 - 4 seasons before needing to be replaced. That said, they are very agreeable in their willingness to reseed and/or to reproduce easily by cuttings. In the garden, cutting back the spent flower stems before they go to seed will encourage repeat bloom through the season. With a well chosen variety of penstemons, you can have bloom from March - August.

PHOTO: Deep pink Mountain Pride penstemon (Penstemon newberryi)can be found as bright carpets in the high rocky reaches of Plumas County as well as the Trinity Alps.

While the species we see in the wild from deserts to foothill meadows to alpine scree are sometimes not willing to make the move to the garden, there’s a wide selection of garden-happy cultivars to try and they are perfect for planting in the garden right now in early spring.

PHOTO: The cultivar P. ‘Garnet’ forms a bright edging in a small home garden Chico.

Some long flowering and colorful cultivars worth trying include the more water-tolerant, bushy 18 – 24 inch ‘Evelyn’, which is a clear pink, and ‘Garnet’ which has a slightly deeper wine color. Also, P. ‘Husker Red’, with its burgundy colored stems and white blooms as well as the species foothills penstemon – P. heterophyllus and one of its cultivars P. h. ‘Margarita BOB’. The drier-loving penstemons pair well with salvias and buckwheats to make a lush-looking waterwise and habitat friendly planting that will look good from spring through fall.

PHOTO: The fresh, saturated color of foothills penstemon (Penstemon heterophyllus).

For those of you considering replacing thirsty plants or lawn in this year of deep drought, consider adding some penstemons to your list. Find a sunny spot, provide good drainage, water as needed while they are getting established and then once a week at most after that. No fertilizer needed. Cut the blooms and bring them inside. Or, sit back and enjoy them and the many garden visitors they invite into the garden with them - big fat bumblebees, whirring hummingbirds, and content gardeners.

PHOTO: Tall pink Cleveland penstemon (Penstemon clevelandii) in a dry, desert planting in the Oroville garden of Catie and Jim Bishop

For more information on Penstemons, visit the American Penstemon Society.

The society is hosting a conference May 16-19, 2014: The 2014 APS rendezvous will be headquartered at Springdale, UT, with a backdrop of Zion National Park. Those who join in this APS annual event will see many penstemons and other native flora of southwestern Utah at a prime time for comfortable temperatures and unsurpassed desert color. Formal tours during this event will be held in Zion National Park, and a loop which will pass near Cedar City, Old Iron Town, Enterprise, Snow Canyon, and the edge of the Mojave Desert in Utah; where we will see a diverse variety of penstemons and other native plants.

Follow Jewellgarden.com/In a North State Garden on Facebook - become a fan today!

To submit plant/gardening related events/classes to the Jewellgarden.com on-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events, send the pertinent information to me at: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com

Did you know I send out a weekly email with information about upcoming topics and gardening related events in the North State region? If you would like to be added to the mailing list, send an email to Jennifer@jewellgarden.com.

In a North State Garden is a weekly Northstate Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California. It is made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday mornings at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time.

The Wildflowers of Table Mountain, a Naturalist’s Guide - 2nd Edition (Color)

March 15th, 2014

Despite a long and primarily dry winter, just this week I saw some of the most colorful, lovely and resilient wildflowers - rich yellow Douglas’s violets (Viola douglasii ‘Steudel’) and shooting stars (Dodecatheon sp.). While I know it will not be a banner wildflower year, I know that even the small and few wildflowers that appear this year will bring beauty, and paying attention to how they respond and how they survive in the face of extreme climate conditions.

Nature is by far the most genius of garden designers, the most creative of floral arrangers. And if there’s one thing Nature loves, it’s color. Bright, mellow, bold, muted, clear: the whole rainbow of color. Most of us do too, which is why the new expanded and full-color edition of “Wildflowers of Table Mountain, a Naturalist’s Guide“, is both a treat of photography and a useful tool of information for plant lovers of our region. Photo: Wildflowers at table mountain. Read the rest of this entry »

Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Classes and Workshops - Spring 2014

March 8th, 2014

Today my guest is Rosa Maicas, a certified permaculture designer and the founder of the educational non-profit Perma-Fun-K. Perma-Fun-K offers hands on permaculture workshops and lectures for children and adults in California and Spain. Today Rosa joins us to talk about a series of permaculture lectures – open to the public, which she is hosting this spring at the Butte College, Chico Center on Forest Ave., with accompanying hands on workshops.


Q: Let’s start with what is Permaculture?

A: Well, the series began with apiece on Permaculture is an eco design science that uses deep observation and applies methods and techniques to mimic nature systems and adapt them to our education, economy, housing, farming and wild-life. It is an effort to care of the land, for the people who work on the land, all the life that lives off the land and to care for community, specifically to integrate all of these goals and activities -
an effort to take care of one of these goals should not harm the advancement of the other goals.

Q: This is your third series of classes and hands on workshops, the first two series in previous years. This year’s spring series is being held at Butte College’s Chico Center on Forest Avenue in Chico. What topics will this series cover:

A: The series started in mid-February with a class introducing people to permaculture, its origins, ethics, and principles, including how it has evolved through climates and across climate and continents over time. The second class discussed Urban Homesteading and how permaculture design can be applied to urban backyards to include intensive and productive gardens, small animals, living fences, pollinators, compost areas and water catchments. The classes still to come include some very specific applications:

March 13 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Lectures with Rosa Maicas “Edible Mushrooms and Inoculation”: 6:30 - 8:30 pm. Butte College Chico Campus Chico Center Student Lounge Room 146, 2320 Forest Ave. Chico. Free for Butte College students and staff. $5 to $10 sliding scale donation for community. Learn how to propagate edible mushrooms at home and in small areas. Proceeds to benefit Perma-Fun-K. For more info visit: Perma-fun-k.com.

April 3 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Lectures with Rosa Maicas “Water Catchments”: 6:30 - 8:30 pm. Butte College Chico Campus Chico Center Student Lounge Room 146, 2320 Forest Ave. Chico. Free for Butte College students and staff. $5 to $10 sliding scale donation for community. Learn how to calculate your roof water run-off, place rain water collecting tanks, and have a grey water system in your home. Proceeds to benefit Perma-Fun-K. For more info visit: Perma-fun-k.com.

April 17 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Lectures with Rosa Maicas “Food Forests”: 6:30 - 8:30 pm. Butte College Chico Campus Chico Center Student Lounge Room 146, 2320 Forest Ave. Chico. Free for Butte College students and staff. $5 to $10 sliding scale donation for community. Create a food forest wetland in your backyard integrating canopy trees, fruit and nut trees, herbaceous perennials, shrubs, bulbs, vines and cover crops together. Maximize production, diversity and soil biology with minimal space and water consumption. Proceeds to benefit Perma-Fun-K. For more info visit: Perma-fun-k.com.

Q: The original series is a class/lecture format, but there are also hands on events being offered as well?

A: For each of the classes, we are also planning an Urban Strategies hands-on workshops series at 689 East 18th Street (Happy Corner) in Chapmantown from 12 - 5 pm. The cost for these is $20 for Butte Students, $40 for general community members, pre-register at: Perma_fun_kinfo@yahoo.com. In these workshops, participants will actually build or put into use some of the principles we’re covering in class. These include:

March 23 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Hands on Workshops with Rosa Maicas “Edible Mushrooms and Inoculation PARTY”: 12 pm - 5 pm. $40 (log inoculation only: $1 log $10, 2 logs $15, 3 logs $20). To register email perma_fun_kchico@yahoo.com, or call: 239-272-9661. 689 E. 18th Street, Chico. Come out for a great hands on workshop learning about edible and medicinal mushrooms and how to propagate edible mushrooms at home and in small areas. All participants will go home with an inoculated oak log to begin growing your own mushrooms. Proceeds to benefit Perma-Fun-K. For more info visit: Perma-fun-k.com.

April 13 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Hands on Workshops with Rosa Maicas “Homesteading: Intensive Gardening and Backyard Food Forests”

May 11 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Hands on Workshops with Rosa Maicas “Water Catchments, roof calculations and Water Tank Building”

June 15 – Chico: Perma-Fun-K Permaculture Hands on Workshops with Rosa Maicas “Hydrogen Cell building”

Q: In your personal experience, Rosa, why is this information so important?

It is just so important to integrate what we need with what we do. To care for people, to care for the land and to do this in harmony. It is vitally important to all of our futures.

For more information on how to attend upcoming perma-fun-k events, or for upcoming fundraisers and to support their efforts, please visit their website: perma-fun-k.com.

Follow Jewellgarden.com/In a North State Garden on Facebook.

To submit plant/gardening related events/classes to the Jewellgarden.com on-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events, send the pertinent information to me at: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com

Did you know I send out a weekly email with information about upcoming topics and gardening related events? If you would like to be added to the mailing list, send an email to Jennifer@jewellgarden.com.

In a North State Garden is a weekly Northstate Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California and made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In A North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday mornings at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time. Podcasts of past shows are available here. Weekly essays are also posted on anewscafe.com a regional news source that is simultaneously universal and positively North State.

March in the Garden & North State Calendar of Regional Gardening Events

March 1st, 2014

PHOTO: Native Salvia dorrii, in bloom at Gateway Science Museum’s Native Plant Pollinator Garden. The garden has received no supplemental water since November of 2013.

It never seems to fail that despite plenty to do in the garden in January and February, there is a sense of waiting, and yet by March we are running to catch up. The season of seeding and plant sales and flower shows is upon us in a big way and this month holds some of the best public educational and entertainment events of the year. Despite our record low precipitation, March is a month that bursts at the seams with life.

It also rarely seems to fail in life that it takes the Universe giving us a good shove to get us to change our established ways and views on things. As devastating as this drought is and stands to be for us as gardeners, with the urgency it creates it also affords us an important opportunity to re-view our gardens and our gardening habits. Read the rest of this entry »

Walk This Way: Wild Food Wanders with Wolfgang Rougle

February 21st, 2014

Local farmer, author and wild food advocate Wolfgang Rougle will join up with Slow Food Shasta Cascade to offer two upcoming walks open to the public in Chico’s Lower Bidwell Park in the coming weeks.
PHOTO: Delicious and nutritious miner’s lettuce (above) and winter chickweed (below) - nutritious weeds coming up in parks and gardens right now and ready to eat! Wolfgang will help you to identify these and more on her upcoming Wild Food Wanders.


PHOTOS above and below: Both the blossoms and the young pea pods of Western red bud are edible.

Wolfgang is an encyclopedia of knowledge about wild foods in the Sacramento Valley, including their historical uses by early settlers and indigenous peoples. The walks are sure to delight and inspire and is free. Space is limited, so please RSVP at slowfoodshastacascade@yahoo.com by February 21st and February 28th respectively. And, bring your camera!

Wild Food Wanders are scheduled for Saturday, February 22nd, 1 pm until 3 pm and Saturday March 1st, 3pm - 4 pm. Read the rest of this entry »

The Magic of Mosses

February 15th, 2014

Photo: A mossy rock along a riparian corridor. Identification of mosses is complex and technical, requiring microscopy in most cases. For the photos in this essay, I will not attempt to identify the individual species, but merely appreciate the beauty of different mosses.

With even a little bit of seasonal moisture arrives another seasonal pleasure – the velvet green sheen and silvery shimmer of mosses everywhere I look - on wood, on stone, on ground seemingly lifeless just moments ago.

I first became friends with my garden in the winter of 2007 – 2008, a wet winter with long periods of grey and fog. My garden includes some areas of dappled light shade beneath large trees, it includes some low, poorly draining areas and areas with stone. That winter, one of the surprises that lifted my spirits after too much grey and rain and fog was the light slanting, shimmering, across surfaces carpeted with moss. And not just one kind of moss, but many kinds that wove together over spans of clay dirt, over large rocks, up aging tree trunks and out across branches like an elegant winter evening wrap.

The Ecology of Moss:

Mosses are a group of spore – rather than seed – bearing land plants, and together with the hornworts and liverworts, they form the larger category known as Bryophytes. Ferns and flowering plants are vascular and are also known as Tracheophytes.

Bryophytes are small, herbaceous plants that grow closely packed together in mats or cushions on rocks, soil, or as epiphytes on the trunks and leaves of forest trees. They are world-wide in distribution in all environments. Although they can occur in deserts or be submerged in water, most mosses occupy moist, shaded habitats. Bryophytes are non-vascular, they have no root systems and they do not conduct water and nutrients through their living tissues, rather water moves through their cells by osmosis. Because they reproduce by spores, rather than seed, their life-cycle consists of several distinct stages of life.

Mosses live in every environment across the globe except salt water. According to different sources, there are between 12,500 and 14, 500 known species of mosses and more than 600 are described as native to California.

“During the prehistoric age, these carpets [of moss] were the basis for developing topsoil. As moss grew thicker, the bottoms of these thick masses formed rich compost, and in this soft, moist, rich environment ferns had their beginnings. For many mosses, shade and acidic conditions are helpful, and moisture is key to success,” describes Joel Lerner of the Washington Post in an article on moss gardening.

Scientists who study mosses are known as Bryologists. Scientists believe that “the bryophytes [as a group] are a ‘key’ in our understanding of how the modern land plants (comprising the three bryophyte lineages plus the vascular plants) are related to each other phylogenetically and how they came to conquer the land environment.”

For the most part, mosses grow in the presence of moisture and go dormant during dry periods. They are extremely drought tolerant and can remain dormant and still viable for extended periods of time and then spring back to life again when moisture returns. The look and habit of a moss in dormancy is often required to confirm species identification.

While moss is sometimes battled by homeowners and gardeners when it is growing in areas that they don’t want it, or think they want something else, the fact is that moss is not parasitic, but an epiphyte which with no root systems derives its moisture and nutrients from the air, not from other materials. So moss itself does not do direct harm to trees, rocks, concrete (roof tiles, driveways) or other plants.

The History of Moss Gardening:

Mosses have long been used a decorative elements – sometimes the defining element in ornamental gardens. Traditional Chinese and Japanese garden designs include purposeful Moss Gardens. The oldest known Moss Garden is Saiho-Ji in Kyoto, and dates back to the 1300s. According to sources, “ironically, the moss for which the temple is known was not part of Musō’s original design. French historian François Berthier indicated that the garden’s ‘islands’ were ‘carpeted with white sand’ in the fourteenth century. The moss came much later, of its own accord during the Meiji era (1860-1912), when the monastery lacked sufficient funds for upkeep.”

So the oldest moss garden in the world shares benign neglect as a design approach with my garden. Beauty can arises in surprising ways.

My first spellbinding moss garden experience was at the Bloedel Reserve on Washington’s Bainbridge Island. Built in the 1950s, the Bloedel’s Moss Garden is a lovely example of a purposefully planted and well-tended design.

After my first winter in the North State, I thought: I should plant a moss garden! But just one long hot 7 month summer without rain, as well as the adamant response of at least one gardening friend that we in the Valley did not in fact live in an environment suitable to moss gardening, dissuaded me of this vision.

But that doesn’t stop me from me fully enjoying the fleeting seasonal pleasure of the almost-pop-up-installation-art quality of nature’s winter moss gardens that are radiant silver, bronze and every shade of green vignettes across around our region and in my garden after a good rain.

While there are several sources for purchasing moss with which to garden, I would highly recommend you use what your garden already grows naturally and enjoy it as it evolves during the periods of time it is naturally prone to growing. It will add to your pleasure of your space and cause no harm to the environments around you.

There are many interesting methods for increasing the mosses already in your garden and introducing them into other areas of your garden conducive to their growth - including creating moss-covered terra cotta pots for an aged looked. Search the web for “creating your own moss covered pots” to learn more.


Additional Resources:

Gathering moss‬: ‪a natural and cultural history of mosses‬‬‬
Robin Wall Kimmerer‬
‪Oregon State University Press‬, ‪Mar 1, 2003‬‬‬‬‬

Moss Gardening: Including Lichens, Liverworts, and Other Miniatures Hardcover – Illustrated, Timber Press
by George Schenk

Mosses and other Bryophytes, An Illustrated Glossary, Bill and Nancy Malcolm

California Mosses, Bill and Nancy Malcolm, and Jim Shevok and Dan Norris.

Photo: In honor of Valentine’s Day - a mossy heart from mother nature.

Follow Jewellgarden.com/In a North State Garden on Facebook

To submit plant/gardening related events/classes to the Jewellgarden.com on-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events, send the pertinent information to me at: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com

Did you know I send out a weekly email with information about upcoming topics and gardening related events? If you would like to be added to the mailing list, send an email to Jennifer@jewellgarden.com.

In a North State Garden is a weekly Northstate Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California and made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday mornings at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time.

Paean to My Hens

February 8th, 2014

My hens are laying up a storm now that storms have arrived in our part of the world. I welcome both! Shrove Tuesday is March 4th this year, so the Lenten Season is just a short month away.

Every year Shrove Tuesday arrives - the day before Ash Wednesday and the beginning of Lent, the Catholic/Anglican/Episcopal 40-day season of thoughtful repentance and fasting before Easter - and I think to myself: “it’s pancakes for dinner tonight.” Photo: Two of my hens on pest control duty in the garden. Read the rest of this entry »

Waiting For the Rain, February in the Garden & North State Calendar of Gardening Events

February 1st, 2014


Photo : A small Pacific chorus frog, waiting.

How long has it been?

I sat with my eyes closed this past Wednesday just listening - listening to the sound of the rain on the roof, on the trees, on passing car tires and I wondered - how long has it been? Within minutes of the rain beginning I got texts, emails and phone calls: IT’S REALLY RAINING!!

Just like seeing green after a long colorless dormant season is soothing to the eyes somehow, so too the sound of the rain this week was soothing and relieving to the ears. Our bodies know - and our gardens, farms and landscapes remind us daily - we need precipitation to survive and thrive.

According to the National Weather Service “2013 marked the smallest amount of precipitation since record keeping began 164 years ago,” and so far 2014 isn’t looking better. There are a variety of reasons attributed for this current trend, including a massive (4 miles high, 2000 miles long) high-pressure ridge in the atmosphere sitting off the coast of California and deflecting any winter weather around us. The International Business News reported on January 27th that “The country’s most populous state is entering its third year of record-low rainfall, and now scientists are raising the alarm that “megadroughts,” [which can last 10s and 100s of years, and] which haven’t been seen in hundreds of years, could be just around the corner.”


Photo : A stand of grey pine back lit by winter’s afternoon light.

California Governor Jerry Brown said in a statement earlier this month “We can’t make it rain, but we can be much better prepared for the terrible consequences that California’s drought now threatens, including dramatically less water for our farms and communities and increased fires in both urban and rural areas. I’ve declared this an emergency, and I’m calling all Californians to conserve water in every way possible.”


Photo : The dried seed head of a native twining brodiaea seed head in place in Late January.

The last rain in my Chico garden prior to Wednesday’s .25 inches, was on Friday December 6th when my rain gauge registered .23 inches. That’s 54 days without rain, and a rainfall total of .58 inches, in a time period when our (wishful) average rainfall should total more than 10 inches. In our mountains, the California Department of Water reports that our snowpack ranges from 6 – 21 % of normal for this time of year.

And you can see, smell and hear the difference all around us. The early spring bloomers are up in the garden and on the trails, but they seem smaller and fewer than usual. “They seem to be a little confused, too” said one gardening friend. “The narcissus appear and dry out almost immediately,” said another and noted seeing butterflies like pipevine swallowtails already hatched out - far, far earlier than usual. In a time of year when we are usually enjoying evenings full of the sounds of rainfall and Pacific Chorus Frogs in our creeks, the January evenings have been relatively mute. How do these creatures adapt? How can we?

We’re all waiting for the rain, and trying to figure out what to do now and going forward as it does not arrive.


Photo : Unfurling leaves of the first of the native buckeyes.

WHAT TO DO IN YOUR GARDEN THIS MONTH:

February in the garden is an interesting in-between month. Keep pruning dormant trees and vines, and roses in the warmer sections of the North State. Bare root plants are widely available at our local nurseries and ready to be planted during breaks from bad weather if your soil is not too frozen or too wet. With continued dry weather, remember to irrigate new plantings as necessary. Keep in mind that while the dry weather might prompt you to irrigate your established plants - annual edibles and your perennials plants and trees - keep in mind that less is more. Daylight hours are still short and nighttime temperatures are still cool, so established plants might appreciate a deep watering once a week or once every other week, these plants are not yet in their real growing stage and do not require a lot. Overwatering now will only increase your fungal issues in the soil and on foliage.

Now is a great time to consider what plants (and lawn areas) require a lot of water to stay looking good and to consider how important these are to you. Perhaps this is the year to replace your unused lawn areas?

If you are going to start tender vegetable or annual seeds indoors, bad weather February days and early February evenings are good times to do this; some cold happy vegetable starts or seeds including lettuce beets broccoli carrots and chard can be sown outside already.


Photo: A frosty little oak leaf pinch-pot sculpture in the morning garden path.

Here is a MID-WINTER CHECKLIST from Wyntour Gardens in Redding:

FOR WATER GARDENS & FISH PONDS ˆ Check water-flow from pumps, check
intakes, leaf traps, skimmer nets, clean out all debris, and clear debris from filters. Check the health of
your fish, check water levels in your pond and overall pond area. It‚s time to add Barley Extract, or
Barley Straw, also beneficial bacteria. It‚s time to divide Lotus and Water Lilies. If you have any
questions, please give Sherrie, our Pond and Water Garden expert a call.

COOL SEASON VEGGIE STARTS Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbage,
Cauliflower, Chard, Collards, Arugula, Red Sails, Mesclun mix, Joi Choi, Onions, Spinach, Kale and onion
starts of California Red, Italian Red Torpedo, Walla Walla and Yellow Sweet Spanish.

Now is a good time to plant SPRING PLANTED SUMMER BLOOMING BULBS: Gladiolas, Japanese Iris, Dahlias, Clematis, Tuberose, Begonias, Cannes, Oxallis, Peonies & Tree Peonies, and Oriental, Tiger & Asiatic Lilies.

While weather remains warm, dry and not windy, consider applying another dormant spray on your fruit trees and to give them a fresh coat of white latex paint to protect them from sunburn.


Photo : As the light lengthens a little each day, the hens begin to pick up in their laying.

CALENDAR OF NORTH STATE GARDENING EVENTS:

The On-line Calendar of Regional Gardening Events at jewellgarden.com adds events throughout the month. I do my very best to keep the calendar up to date and accurate, please confirm all events with the event host. If you have an event you would like listed or if you are aware of a mistake on the calendar, please send all pertinent information to: Jennifer@jewellgarden.com! Thanks!


Photo : Witch hazel branches in bloom by mid-February. Handcrafted pottery vase by Roseberry Winn Pottery and Tile in Tiverton, RI.

FEBRUARY 2014

Feb 1 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Winter Birds in Davis: Slide Show and Tour 10:30am, Environmental Horticulture 146. Our feathered friends are fascinating! Learn about birds that winter in Davis during a slide show talk. Then take a walk to see birds in the Arboretum (weather permitting). The event is free; limited free one hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Feb 1 - Whiskeytown: Fruit Tree Restoration Workshop Annual Wiskeytown Fruit Tree Workshop 10 AM. Learn about and participate in the techniques of old tree restoration. Learn from the Fruit Tree Planting Foundations Certified Arborist Rico Montenegro. This workshop and hands on activity is an annual event and is for those who want to learn how to restore old, neglected and abused fruit trees. Whiskeytown’s fruit trees are about 100 to 150 years of age. The information will be applicable to all types of trees as well. This is an opportunity to not only have hands on experience, (so bring your tools), but you have an opportunity to feel that you’re contributing something back to the community. The workshop is about an hour and will be held upstairs in the old Camden House or outdoors depending on weather. Afterwards we will assemble outside to tour and actually participate in some of the restoration of these old heritage fruit trees. Space is limited, please either RSVP and further information will be provided. RSVP contact: Rico Montenegro 530- 515-7657

Feb 1 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Charlie Rabbit and His Friends 10:30 am. Join us the first Saturday of every month for an interactive program in the Gardens (or Greenhouse when it rains) for children, their siblings, parents and Grandparents. Join Charlie, our adorable jack rabbit puppet, in various gardening activities. Wear your favorite gardening clothes! Presented by Dennis and Sherrill Bambauer. Free with park admission! Meet at the Arboretum & Botanical Gardens Office (1135 Arboretum Drive next to Nursery Greenhouse)


Photo : Early foliage and bud of native fritillary.

Feb 1 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Field Trip Sacramento Ditch Trail at Walker Mine. This fieldtrip will explore the Sacramento Ditch Trail starting at Walker Mine Road. We will walk up the trail for about two miles, and take a side trail to the Sacramento River. There are varied plants along the trail; a free plant list will be given to participants. This will be an easy walk on a fairly level trail for four to five miles. Meet at Redding City Hall south parking lot on Parkview Avenue at 9 AM. No dogs, please. For more information, call David Ledger at 355-8542. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

Feb 1 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: Grape Vine Pruning and Care Workshop 11 am, join us for some great information! please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Feb 4 – Chico: Chico Seed Lending Library Monthly “Lettuce Get Together” Join us next Tuesday 2/4 from 5-7pm for (a short notice) ‘Lettuce Get Together’! We’ll begin packaging up our WARM SEASON varieties of seed, most of which have been generously donated by local patrons and organic seed companies. We hope to see you there! For more Information https://www.facebook.com/ChicoSLL

Feb 5 - Davis: Center for Urban Horticulture Conference: Current Issues in Invasive/Emerging Pests and Diseases 9:30 am - 3:30 pm. This fast-paced conference discusses pest and diseases in horticulture. Hear experts speak about specific pests and diseases that have infested or are expected to possibly infest our nurseries and landscapes. At the conference you can sign up to earn a First Detector Certification to become part of a group that helps local agencies identify new infestations. Follow the web address below to see workshop topics, then scroll down to fill out the information requested and register. If you pay by check, please make it out to UC Regents and send to me at the address below. http://ucanr.edu/survey/survey.cfm?surveynumber=11414


Photo : Late January blooms golden and fragrant on native yellow ribes (Ribes aureum).

Feb 5 - Colusa: Establishment Practices and Benefits of Hedgerows on Farms in the Sacramento Valley 1:30 pm - 3:30 pm. 48th Annual Colusa Farm Show Colusa County Fairgrounds, Stagehands Theater Wednesday, February 5, 2014 | 1:30 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. This workshop will focus on the benefits of hedgerows of California native plants in agricultural landscapes, including enhanced populations of game birds, native bees and beneficial insects on farms. We will also discuss establishment and maintenance practices for planting habitat on field crop edges and provide an overview of plant species appropriate for hedgerows in the Sacramento Valley and beyond. 1:30 Welcome and DPR Grant Project Update, Mary Fahey,Project Assistant, UCCE, Yolo County 1:40 Hedgerows and Birds, Karen Velas, Audubon California 1:45 Establishing Hedgerows on Field Edges, Miles DaPrato, Solano Resource Conservation District 2:10 Native Bees and Hedgerows, Jessa Cruz, Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation 2:35 Hedgerows and IPM, Rachael Long, UCCE Farm Advisor, Yolo County 2:55 Hedgerow Plant Selection, John Anderson, Hedgerow Farms, Inc. 3:15 Summary and Audience Survey

Feb 5 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society regular Monthly Meeting & Program Paula Shapiro, chapter Horticulture Chair will present “Cuba with a Botanical Slant” 7:30 pm Chico Butte County Library. Based on a tour she took last March, Paula will show us photos of botanical gardens, national parks, the largest wetland preserve in the Caribbean, restoration projects and community gardens. Ecosystems range from urban ocean front to mountainous areas where orchids grow wild. For more information see website at mountlassen.cnps.org

Feb 8 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Field Trip Lower Brandy Creek Trail Hike. This fieldtrip will follow a beautiful trail up Brandy Creek starting at Kennedy Memorial Drive. We will walk up Brandy Creek for two and one-half miles and back for a total of five miles. This is a fairly easy hike with varying terrain winding between open spaces and canopies of black oak, tanoak, and mixed conifers. We will turn around at the site of an old homestead. Parking pass required. Meet at Redding City Hall in the south parking lot on Parkview Avenue at 9 AM. No dogs, please. For more information, call David Ledger at 355-8542. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

Feb 8 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: BERRY CARE & PRUNING 11 am, Learn to prune and grow different berries; cane berries, blueberries and strawberries. Please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.


Photo : Native oak - late winter garb.

Feb 8 – Chico: Magnolia Gift & Garden Pruning Class 11 am, Learn to prune what this time of year with Kurt. For more information: http://magnoliagardening.com/events/. Magnolia Gift & Garden 1367 East Ave Chico, Ca 95926

Feb 9 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Family Program: Native Californian Elderberry Flute-Making Workshop 1–3 p.m., 146 Environmental Horticulture. In this free two-hour workshop, people of all ages will learn how to make and play a Native Californian elderberry flute. East Bay Regional Parks docent Antonio Flores will talk about the culture of flute-making and also about the endangered elderberry beetle. All materials will be supplied. Please bring a sharpened pocket knife if you have one. Adults will need to supervise their young children. The event is free; limited free one hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Feb 10 – Paradise: Paradise Garden Club: General Monthly Meeting and Program - Public Welcome 12:30 pm, Terry Ashe Recreation Center, Paradise. General Membership Meeting follows program. Plant Sale, Benefit Drawing, Refreshments. For more info: www.paradisegardenclub.org

Feb 12 - Davis: UC Davis Arboretum Walk with Warren: West-end Gardens 12 pm, Gazebo. Join Warren Roberts, the Superintendent Emeritus of the Arboretum and famous storyteller and punster for an always engaging noontime exploration of the UC Davis Arboretum’s west-end gardens. The event is free; limited free one hour parking is available along Garrod Drive near the Gazebo or in nearby Visitor Parking Lot 55 where parking can be paid by meter or by purchase of an $8 daily pass. For more information and directions, please call (530) 752-4880 or visit http://arboretum.ucdavis.edu/calendar.aspx.

Feb 14 - FULL MOON (Full Snow Moon)

Feb 14 – Anderson: Anderson Valley Garden Club Monthly Meeting 12 - 1 pm. Anderson City Hall COmmunity Room. Anderson: Anderson Valley Garden Club Monthly Meeting and Program 12 noon, public welcome. Anderson Valley Garden Club meets the 2nd friday of each month at the Anderson City Hall Community Room unless otherwise stated. Meeting begins at noon. For more information call Nancy: 530-365-2014.

Feb 15 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: Grape Vine Pruning and Care Workshop 11 am, join us for some great information! please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Feb 15 - Chico: Chico Permaculture Monthly Meeting 1 - 4pm, Butte County Library, Chico. CPG EDUCATION/WORKSHOPS: Permaculture design concepts: Over the next few winter months we will help members understand the permaculture design process. Bring maps of your property if you have them, even a quick sketch is great! We will spend approx. 45 minutes during each gathering (through March 2014) on this topic. The focus of this month (February) will be on learning about the importance of W-A-S design. Site assessment and analysis will be covered through the lens of how water, access and structures (W-A-S) are interrelated and how they function (or could function) for greatest abundance and land health. For more info:https://www.facebook.com/groups/chicopermacultureguild/

Feb 15 – Chico: Magnolia Gift & Garden Landscaping with Dogs Class 11:30 am, Hosted by Trish. If you have dogs then you may know how tricky it can be to have the yard that you truly desire. Trish will be sharing some tips and ideas on how you can have the best of both worlds-Dogs and a Great Landscape! For more information: http://magnoliagardening.com/events/. Magnolia Gift & Garden 1367 East Ave Chico, Ca 95926

Feb 16 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: SUCCESSFUL SEED STARTING 11 am, Join Ferne and learn to successfully grow your own vegetable starts by seed. Please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Feb 16 - Chico: Mt. Lassen Chapter of the California Native Plant Society Field Trip: CSU Greenhouse Tour Meet at CSU Health Center parking lot at the corner of Warner St and College Ave at 10am. From there we will walk the short distance to the greenhouses. Tim Devine has collected hundreds of unusual plants from all over the world and has successfully propagated many of them. We will see a number of species from the California deserts as well as plants from aquatic and tropical settings. For more information call Tim at 530-345-8444. For more information see website at mountlassen.cnps.org

Feb 17 - Cottonwood: Cottonwood Garden Club Monthly Meeting 10 am - 12 noon. The meetings are educational and social with a potluck following meetings. Different speakers teach a variety of topics from scarecrow making to attracting birds into your garden. Cottonwood Cummunity Center, 20595 Gas Point Road (behind the little league fields). Call 347-3852 for more information.

Feb 19 - Chico: Chico Horticultural Society Regular Monthly Meeting and Program on Design and Construction of a Pollinator Garden with John Whittlesey of Canyon Creek Nursery & Design 9:30 am meet/coffee, 10 am program. A well-known plantsman and designer of habitat and regionally adapted gardens, John will be to talking to us about the design considerations, construction (including siting) and plant selections for a well-rounded pollinator garden. A thoughtfully considered pollinator garden will provide food, water and shelter for a wide variety of our native pollinators year-round, and at the same time bring life, color and interest for you the gardener to enjoy year-round. Butte County Library - 1st Avenue, Chico. For more info: President, Carol J. at 345-4824 or email: chicohort@gmail.com.

Feb 19 - Redding: Shasta Rose Society Monthly Meeting 7 - 8 pm. The meetings are held for the purpose of presenting an educational program by an authority on roses and their cultivation. Meetings are open to the public. City of Redding Corporation Yard, 2055 Viking Way, Building 4, Room 401, Redding, California. For more info: http://www.shastarosesociety.org/Shasta_Rose_Society/Home.html

Feb 20 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Monthly Meeting and Program by Lawrence Janeway on pursuing rare Carex and more 7 - 9 pm. Chapter business followed by a presentation A man of many botany hats, Lawrence Janeway will give a presentation on his pursuits of rare and undescribed species of Carex, and more. Lawrence is a botanist with Plumas National Forest, Curator of the Chico State Herbarium, and an expert on sedges and clarkias. Meet at 7 PM at the Shasta College Health Science & University Programs building in downtown Redding, 1400 Market Street, Community Room 8220 (clock tower building at the north end of the Market Street Promenade; enter on south side of building). A Board meeting will be held before the regular meeting, at 5:30 PM at Angelo’s Pizza Parlour in the Foundry Square, 1774 California Street, Redding. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org


Photo : Native manzanita in late winter bloom.

Feb 22 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Field Trip South Fork Mountain Road Hike. This is a seven-mile round-trip fieldtrip along a gravel service road to South Fork Mountain, which has very diverse habitats and plants along the way. There will be a gentle climb of 1200 feet, starting in knobcone pine and traversing through chaparral and canyon live oak, and ending in mixed conifers. Plants along the way include showy phlox, paintbrush, mock orange, deltoid balsamroot, Pacific sedum, Hartweg’s wild ginger, and firecracker flower. It has great views of Whiskeytown Lake and Shasta Bally. Walk participants will be given a plant list. Meet at Redding City Hall in the south parking lot on Parkview Avenue at 9 AM. No dogs, please. For more information, call David Ledger at 355-8542. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

Feb 22 – Chico: Cultivating Community North Valley: Seed Saving Series Workshop #2 - Transplanting Cool Season Crops 2:00 - 4:00 P.M. In the Heartseed Greenhouse at the GRUB Cooperative. 1525 Dayton Road Pre-Registration is required at cultivatingcommunitynv.org. Priority is given to Income-Eligible participants. Price for Income-Eligible participants: Free. Income-Ineligible participants may sign up for the waiting list: If there is space, we will contact you within one week of the event. Cost will be $10. Paid day of event at sign-in table. Class size is limited to 25. Address: GRUB Cooperative 1525 Dayton Rd Chico, California 95928

Feb 22 – Redding: McConnell Arboretum & Botanical Gardens at Turtle Bay: Walk with Horticultural Manager Lisa Endicott 10:30 am. Bring your notebooks and camera! We’ll make our way through the Gardens with frequent stops for discussions about (what else?) plants! Free with Park or Garden admission. Meet at West Garden Entrance. Take N. Market Street, turn on Arboretum Drive. Take the right fork. Parking lot and entrance are on the left.

Feb 22 – Chico: The Plant Barn Nursery & Gifts “Care and culture of Fruit trees” 11 am. Our speaker will be James Shao of L.E. Cooke company. He is an amazing wealth of information. He will discuss pruning-including a year round schedule for pruning. He will also highlight what fruit does well in our area. For more Information: The Plant Barn and Gifts 406 Entler Ave Chico, Ca 95928 530-345-3121/fax 530-345-5354 www.theplantbarn.com

Feb 22 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: BERRY CARE & PRUNING 11 am, Learn to prune and grow different berries; cane berries, blueberries and strawberries. Please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Feb 23 - Redding: Shasta Chapter CNPS Plant Propagation Session 10 am - 12 noon. Plant Propagation Session. Join us for our regular two-hour work session starting at 10 AM at the Shasta College greenhouses. The greenhouses are located toward the back of Shasta College, near the livestock barns. We will be potting up newly rooted materials from our December cuttings and seeds. Bring clippers and any other tools you might need. Please call Jay & Terri Thesken at 221-0906 for further information. Shasta College Greenhouse, near the livestock barns. For more info: http://www.shastacnps.org

Feb 23 – Redding: Wyntour Gardens: SUCCESSFUL SEED STARTING 11 am, Join Ferne and learn to successfully grow your own vegetable starts by seed. Please call or email to reserve your seat! 8026 Airport Road - Redding, CA. 96002 - 530-365-2256 - Email Us: inform@wyntourgarden.com. Hours of Operation: Monday thru Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sundays: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Feb 25 – Chico: Butte Rose Society General Member Meeting and Program When: Meetings are held the last Tuesday of each month starting at 7 pm From: January through May and August through November. Location: Chico Veterans Memorial Hall at 554 Rio Lindo Avenue in Chico, California. Find us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Butte-Rose-Society/189382585776 Contact us by mail: Butte Rose Society at P.O. Box 8888 in Chico, CA 95927. For more info: http://www.butte-rosesociety.org


Photo : Deciduous magnolias will be in full bloom by the end of the month.

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In a North State Garden is a weekly Northstate Public Radio and web-based program celebrating the art, craft and science of home gardening in Northern California and made possible in part by the Gateway Science Museum - Exploring the Natural History of the North State and on the campus of CSU, Chico. In a North State Garden is conceived, written, photographed and hosted by Jennifer Jewell - all rights reserved jewellgarden.com. In a North State Garden airs on Northstate Public Radio Saturday mornings at 7:34 AM Pacific time and Sunday morning at 8:34 AM Pacific time. Weekly essays are also posted on anewscafe.com a regional news source that is simultaneously universal and positively North State.